Courses

Israeli and International Cybersecurity Law / Deborah Housen-Couriel

Semester: 

Yearly

Offered: 

2018

Course Number: 62324

The emerging field of cyber law is characterized by rapid and substantive changes in the activities to which it applies both in the international arena and in Israel. Nearly half of the world's population currently has access to cyberspace, a new human phenomenon that has had much positive impact (such as in the fields of health, education and law).

Cyber Crimes / Dr. Tamar Berenblum

Semester: 

2nd semester

Offered: 

2018

Course Number: 61109

Throughout history, various technological developments, such as the internet, were exploited for criminal and deviant behavior (Grabosky, 2007). the internet allows the breakage of boundaries both of time and space as are embedded in legislation and formal control. Thus, the internet creates an illusion of anonymity, security and lack of supervision, which contributes to expressions of violence and crime. 

This course will examine the Human factor in cyber crime. 

Moreover, since understanding crime and deviance is not complete without a discussion about the ways to handle these behaviors and the modes of social control designed to prevent them; We will examine the regulation of cyber crime as well. 

The "Big Data Revolution": A Critical Approach / Dr. Laurence Barry

Semester: 

2nd semester

Offered: 

2018

Course Number: 54232

Big data has become in the last decade the trendiest tool in a wide range of domains: with the growing capacity to store large amounts of data, came also the algorithmic technologies to analyze them. Following Foucault's claim that power and knowledge come always as entangled, this course will attempt to grasp genealogically the social and political implications of the emergence of these technologies. 
Using Foucault’s conceptual toolbox, we will thus examine the power mechanisms propelled by the algorithms and the kind of social norms they imply. At the individual level, what can be said of the algorithms' effects on the contemporary self? If the process of subjectivation occurs in the relation of the self to truth, what is truth in the big data era, that some have coined the post-truth era? Finally, if the individual remains the provider of data, is there a way to resist this new order, and how?

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